Becoming French

Our first full day in Vence began with coffee and croisants at what was to become my favorite bakery/pastery shop, Pâtisserie Palanque, creator of the famous Craquelin almond brioche.V.jpgScan.jpegIMG_1522.jpg

Before the others arrived,Carolyn and I took the bus to a nearby town to see how easy it would be. It was. The bus stop in Vence was a few blocks away in a beautiful setting (man and musical instruments are topiary)IMG_1098.jpg. Since we were just learning to use a French bus schedule, we missed the right bus and had to wait for the next. No problem. We just sat and sketched.

IMG_1520.jpg

Our bus took us to Tourrettes-sur-Loup, a tiny medieval village just a few miles away. We had read all about it in Mary Busse’s book, Hermitage, Olive Grove, Village. We found the cafe she went to every day just a few feet from the bus stop and enjoyed their violet ice cream. T-s-L is called the “city of violets,” and a full range of violet-based products is on sale in the village shops. The violet fields can be visited from November to March.

book.jpeg

IMG_1115.jpg

us2.jpg

When we returned, the others had arrived at our door for the week. After a well-deserved nap, we all went out for our first French cafe with its charming waiter.

our door.jpeg

selfie.jpg

Sunday. We had been told that there was a mass at 9:00 am at the Cathedral de Notre Dame, so a few of us set out. When we got there, there was a hand-written notice (in French, of course) which we finally understood to say there was no mass at 9 that day, but to come back at 11:00. There was a large mosaic by March Chagall there, so since there was no one else in the church, we said a prayer and got out our paint. It’s called “Moses Saved from the Nile.”

DSCN9400.JPGIMG_1246.jpgIMG_1523.jpg

The rest of the day consisted of an orientation with another group who was painting in oils, a lunch with local residents and just getting acquainted. Dale finished her amazing painting of her seatmate on the plane.

sitting around.jpeg

d.jpgGirl:DB.jpg

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Becoming French

  1. This is an absolutely wonderful post – like we’re almost there – Rather wishing we were in provence. thanks for posting. I don’t remember the Chagall mosaic, and enjoyed seeing. John

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s